PublicationsSystematic reviewsPromoting participationPromoting participation - students
A systematic review of the effectiveness of school-level actions for promoting participation by all students: students' perspective

One of the review team talked to Annie (9), Robin (8), Niamh (6) and Jake (5) about this review. These are the points they wanted to make:

Teachers

  • Teachers don't always help you to feel welcome. This means you lack courage to join in. If you don't join in, you don't do as well in your work.
  • Teachers should treat you with respect. They should not be too bossy. They should be fair about the jobs they ask children to do.
  • Some people think uniforms and badges help you feel part of the school. Others don't. If you're bullied or have other problems, it doesn't help you feel part of the school.

Work

  • Doing work makes you feel part of a school. If you're not enjoying work or it's too hard then you don't feel part of things.
  • When you move up from your first school, you repeat work. Teachers don't explain things and you do less practical work.
  • Some teachers treat everybody the same way without listening to them. They don't take notice of reasons for not finishing work. They don't always set the right work.

Groups

  • People in bottom groups feel stupid. In the top groups they feel smug. It's good to have groups because they're smaller but they should be mixed. The bottom groups always get the extra help. It would be fairer if help was shared around.
  • We help each other in groups. But not everyone likes to work with other people. Sometimes one person relies too much on another.
  • Playing with friends helps people feel included. Children who find it difficult to work can mix with others at playtime.

Parent helpers

  • At school it helps if your own parent comes in as a helper. But having somebody else's parent in doesn't help. It's not fair having one person's parent in and not another's. Children might want their parent in and they can't come.
  
Copyright 2019 Social Science Research Unit, UCL Institute of Education :: Privacy Statement :: Terms Of Use :: Site Map :: Login
About::Projects::Publications::Research Use::Courses & seminars::Resources::Databases::Blog