Courses & seminarsPrevious seminars and events
Previous seminars and events at the EPPI-Centre

Previous seminars and workshops arranged by the EPPI-Centre include the following:

2017

Cochrane PICO: Using linked data technologies for evidence curation (click for slides) 

Date: Wednesday 12 July
Speaker: Chris Mavergames, Cochrane Information and Knowledge Management Department
Part of the London systematic reviews and research use seminar series

The power of the media - reaching wider audiences to make Cochrane evidence accessible to everyone, everywhere in the world

Date: Tuesday 20 June
Speaker: Jo Anthony, Senior Media and Communications Manager, Cochrane
Part of the London systematic reviews and research use seminar series

Qualitative evidence synthesis: Where are we and where are we going? (click title for slides)

Date: Tuesday 23 May
Speaker: Ruth Garside, University of Exeter Medical School
Part of the London systematic reviews and research use seminar series

'What sort of review should I do?' Findings from the MACH (Meta-analysis, Complexity and Heterogeneity) project

Date: Tuesday 21 February 2017
Speaker: Mark Petticrew (Professor of Public Health Evaluation) and Lambert Felix (Research Fellow), LSHTM
Part of the London systematic reviews and research use seminar series

When to rely on informal competence in synthesising research

Date: Tuesday 31 January 2017
Speaker: Ingemar Bohlin, University of Gothenburg
Part of the London systematic reviews and research use seminar series

Approaches for synthesis of complex interventions: components-based network meta-analysis

Date: Tuesday 17 January 2017
Speaker: Deborah Caldwell, University of Bristol
Part of the London systematic reviews and research use seminar series

2016

Learning Curve: What quality assuring systematic reviews can tell us about the past, present & future of evidence synthesis

Date: Tuesday 20 December
Speaker: Toby Lasserson, Cochrane Editorial Unit
Part of the London systematic reviews and research use seminar series

What’s wrong with ‘What Works for Whom, Where’?

Date: Tuesday 22 November
Speaker: Nancy Cartwright, University of Durham and University of California, San Diego
Presentation: Download slides from the presentation
Part of the London systematic reviews and research use seminar series

Systematic reviews in clinical education: Lessons from a BEME systematic review of undergraduate medical education in the General Practice setting

Date: Wednesday 19 October
Speaker: Dr Sophie Park.  Senior Lecturer in Primary Care at UCL Medical School
Part of the London BEME International Collaborating Centre (London BICC) 

EPPI-Centre and the What Works Global Summit 2016

Date: 24-28 September 2016

Click here for video podcasts of our public lectures at the WWGS by Dr David Halpern and Sir Kevan Collins plus details of our involvement in many other sessions at the Summit.

Feeling the earth move: insights on the “dual heritage” of qualitative evidence synthesis

Date: Tuesday 19 July 2016
Speaker: Andrew Booth, University of Sheffield
Part of the London systematic reviews and research use seminar series

Information seeking theory: how can it help us define 'proper' searching for systematic reviews?

Date: 21 June 2016
Speaker: Suzy Paisley, Director of Information Resources, ScHARR, University of Sheffield
Part of the London systematic reviews and research use seminar series

Meta-synthesis of quantitative research findings in education: some risks and benefits

Date: Tuesday 17 May 2016
Speaker: Steve Higgins, Durham University
Part of the London systematic reviews and research use seminar series

Are narrative syntheses and meta-analyses commensurate in terms of argumentation and reasoning?

Date: Tuesday 19 April 2016
Speaker: GJ Melendez-Torres, University of Warwick
Part of the London systematic reviews and research use seminar series

2015

Multidisciplinary reviews 

Date: Tuesday 15 December 2015
Speaker: Sandy Oliver, Professor of Public Policy, EPPI-Centre  
Part of the London systematic reviews and research use seminar series

Evidence review for policy and decision-making: Challenges and opportunities for The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE)

Date: Tuesday 17 November 2015
Speaker: Catherine Swann, Senior Research Associate, EPPI-Centre
Part of the London systematic reviews and research use seminar series

Framework synthesis

Date: Tuesday 20 October 2015
Speaker: Ginny Brunton, Senior Research Officer, EPPI-Centre
Part of the London systematic reviews and research use seminar series

Can we rely on text mining to reduce screening workload in systematic reviews?

Date: Tuesday 22 September 2015
Speakers: James Thomas, Professor of Social Research and Policy and Alison O’Mara-Eves, Senior Research Officer, both EPPI-Centre   
Part of the London systematic reviews and research use seminar series

Moving from research evidence to recommendations

Date: Tuesday 16 June 2015
Speaker: Steve Pilling, Professor of Clinical Psychology and Clinical Effectiveness, UCL 
Part of the London systematic reviews and research use seminar series

Living systematic reviews

Date: Tuesday 26 May 2015
Speaker: Julian Elliott, Honorary Senior Lecturer EPPI-Centre, Head of Clinical Research Unit, Department of Infectious Diseases, Monash University
Part of the London systematic reviews and research use seminar series

Methods of realist synthesis

Date: Tuesday 28 April 2015
Speaker: Justin Jagosh, Senior Research Fellow, Centre for Advancement in Realist Evaluation and Synthesis (CARES), University of Liverpool  
Part of the London systematic reviews and research use seminar series

Methods in a systematic review of the socio-economic impacts of genetically modified crops in six languages

Date: Tuesday 24 March 2015
Speaker: Jaqueline Garcia-Yi, Center of Life and Food Sciences Weihenstephan, Technische Universität München 
Part of the London systematic reviews and research use seminar series

The MACH (Meta-analysis, Complexity & Heterogeneity) study (when to use a meta-analytical approach – or not?)

Date: Tuesday 17 March 2015
Speakers: Mark Petticrew, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, and James Thomas, EPPI-Centre and their colleagues  
Part of the London systematic reviews and research use seminar series

Variations in methods for undertaking systematic reviews: examples from three EPPI-Centre reviews (international development, weight management and social care)

Date: Tuesday 24 February 2015
Speakers: Jan Tripney, Katy Sutcliffe and Kristin Liabo, EPPI-Centre
Part of the London systematic reviews and research use seminar series

 

Other seminars

Methods for deciding which dimensions of inequalities to address in systematic reviews (2014)

Date: 13 March 2014
Synthesising evidence about population health is insufficient if it does not take into account unjust circumstances that influence health status and responses to health interventions. EPPI-Centre systematic reviews pay increasing attention to health inequalities and this was operationalised originally using the mnemonic PROGRESS for Place of residence, Race/ethnicity, Occupation, Gender, Religion, Education, Socio-economic status and Social capital. This was immediately found to be inadequate as it failed to focus attention on other relevant variations in populations. A first response was to include additional variations (such as age, disability and sexual orientation) as they became apparent with successive reviews. A more theoretical approach would be more tightly aligned with what is known about the social determinants of health. This seminar discussed the need for a tool to help systematic reviewers decide on which dimensions of inequalities to focus attention in any particular review.

Self-care Support in Children and Young People’s Physical and Mental Health: Two examples of Integrated reviews (2014)

Date: 4 February 2014
In this seminar, we discussed two National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) projects on self-care support for children, young people and their families that we have led. The speaker discussed the project that she led which focused on self-care support in long-term physical conditions in children and young people’s health (principally asthma, diabetes and cystic fibrosis). There was then a discussion of a follow-up project that he led that focused on self-care support in children and young people’s mental health. Both projects contained a significant integrative review component with talk particularly on experiences of using an EPPI-style approach to handle these reviews. The speaker also discussed the formulation of a model of self-care support in children and young people’s health that has emerged from the two projects.

Configuring causal conditions in systematic reviews of complex interventions: Can Qualitative Comparative Analysis (QCA) help? (2013)

Date: 10 December 2013
Developed on an on-going basis by Charles Ragin and colleagues since the late 1980s, QCA was originally designed to facilitate analyses in political science and historical sociology. The types of analyses which it was developed to conduct typically involved the comparison of nation states with one another; this is a classic ‘small-N-many variables’ scenario, where the number of examples of a phenomenon is small (e.g. OECD countries) and the number of variables which might explain a given outcome might be large (e.g. the factors which give rise to the creation of generous welfare states)*. A parallel with the synthesis of evaluations of complex interventions is clear here, where we often have a limited number of studies, and a large number of possible factors which might explain differences in their findings (e.g. participants, interventions, context, outcome measurement, study design, comparator, etc…). We will present a worked example of a synthesis using QCA and hopefully generate plenty of discussion.

Finding and recording research for reviews – websites and ‘unusual’ sources (2013)

Date: 25 July 2013
Research studies for inclusion in reviews are often identified outside of electronic bibliographic databases. Thus, researching websites and other ‘unusual sources’ is an important method to identify research and involves a range of techniques. However, there are no acknowledged standards for documentation of website and other types of searches. The aim of this seminar was to promote discussion and hear from you about the challenges and solutions of website and unusual source searching and consider standards of conduct and reporting.

Adult Social Care: the trials and tribulations of defining the ‘un-definable’? (2013)

Date: 14 March 2013
A key stage in many systematic reviews is to define carefully all of the concepts under investigation in order to be able to conduct the review, transparently and systematically. The challenge for a recent systematic review of reviews to support the use and development of ‘The adult social care outcomes framework’; was how to define the scope of the work on social care; an area that lacks commonly agreed definitions. In this seminar we outlined some of the approaches we took to address the diversity and complexity of social care populations, interventions and outcomes and the implications this had for the review. The discussion also broadened to consider similar issues and solutions you have encountered in your own review and primary research projects. 
 

Engaging youth in community change for public health through photography (2008)

A half-day seminar, comprising descriptive elements, tools and techniques, aimed at colleagues working in community development; public health or with children and young people. The objectives were:

  • to provide an overview of the CATCH project (Community Approaches to Cardiovascular Health).
  • to describe the photovoice community assessment process, and subsequent engagement of youth in community planning to identify strategies to promote heart healthy environments within the city. 
  • to share the results from the photovoice project and the findings from its youth photovoice project, and to discuss the challenges, facilitating factors and lessons learned in this process.

Transforming the work of schools to embed health promotion: building on the Gatehouse Project (2008)

Schools are not just convenient places to deliver health promotion and health education.  Educational and behavioural research has consistently shown that the school environment impacts both on young people’s educational achievements and health behaviours.  School environments are complex. The workshop objectives were:

  • To provide an overview of the Gatehouse Project and explore ways of working with schools that not just takes account of, but actively utilises complex school environments.
  • The workshop will conclude with reflections and discussion on the challenges for design and evaluation of this approach.
  • Participants will be invited to critically reflect on our questions of research and practice.

Economics and evidence informed public policy and practice in health, social care, and education interventions (2007)

This three-day workshop was aimed at people with no training in economics; its objectives were:

  • to introduce participants to current debates and dilemmas in public health, social care, and education interventions
  • to increase understanding and awareness of basic economic concepts in relation to public health, social care and education
  • to equip participants with skills in critical appraisal of economic studies
  • to provide an introduction to the synthesis of economic evidence to inform public policy and practice.

Evidence-informed Health Promotion and Public Health: encouraging the use of research in practice (2006)

Participants discussed the need to be clear about what evidence informed practice is relevant to each practitioner’s environment, and how systematic reviews relate to evidence informed practice. Careful attention must be paid to the language of evidence-informed practice. This is often a new set of terms which can take practitioners time to become familiar with. Participants described a need for research that is directly relevant to people’s work. They also discussed the need for a hierarchy of evidence to help people decide how to use the evidence and how ‘strong’ a message was being given by the evidence. Research must also differentiate between evidence of need for an intervention, evidence of an intervention’s effectiveness and evidence of its appropriateness. There is also a need to be clear about how possible it is to transfer the interventions under study to individual situations, so that practitioners can evaluate the usefulness of the interventions.

Summary of the event   Slides from the event

  
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