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What are the effects of the roles of mentors or inductors using induction programmes for newly qualified teachers (NQTs) on their professional practice, with special reference to teacher performance, professional learning and retention rates?

What do we want to know?

There was a need to assess the research on the induction of newly qualified teachers, associated programmes and mentoring support in the light of the statutory arrangements for the induction of newly qualified teachers (NQTs) set up in May 1999.

Who wants to know?

The review will be of use to all those involved in the training and recruitment of new teachers.

What did we find?

The review focused upon the performance, professional learning, and retention of NQTs.

Teacher performance

  • Three out of six relevant studies show evidence of the positive impact induction can have on teacher performance.
  • Studies provided evidence that induction helps NQTs address issues of student motivation and assessment.
  • NQT performance was enhanced beyond expectations as the result of induction programmes.

Professional learning

  • Six studies addressed the issue of professional learning, providing evidence that induction was welcomed and valued by NQTs, especially where it provides emotional support.
  • Three of the six studies noted the importance of allowing adequate time for successful induction experiences to occur, and that this is not always afforded.
  • Five of the six studies reported that professional learning was enhanced where serious consideration had been given to matching NQTs with appropriate induction tutors.

Retention rates

  • Three of the six studies addressed the issue of NQT attrition/retention rates, showing a positive correlation between NQT retention and induction experiences.
  • One study reported a dramatic difference between retention rates of a sample of NQTs who had undertaken an induction programme and a control group over three years.

What are the implications?

NQT induction must be appropriately supported, by regular meetings between NQTs and induction tutors, through the provision of adequate contact time between both parties, and serious consideration given to the appropriate matching of NQTs with induction tutors, in terms of teaching specialism and teaching age phase/grade. If this support is given, NQT induction can have a positive impact upon the performance, professional learning and retention of NQTs in the teaching profession.

How did we get these results?

The review question was:
What are the effects of the roles of mentors or inductors using induction programmes for newly qualified teachers (NQTs) on their professional practice, with special reference to teacher performance, professional learning and retention rates?

The review mapped the characteristics of 75 studies. Ten were selected for in-depth review, with six eventually being used in the synthesis, according to suitability and reliability. The studies were all available in English and have all been in the public domain since 1988.

The EPPI-Centre’s reference number for this report is 1603T. The full citation is:

Totterdell M, Woodroffe L, Bubb S, Daly C, Smart T and Arrowsmith, J (2008) What are the effects of the roles of mentors or inductors using induction programmes for newly qualified teachers (NQTs) on their professional practice, with special reference to teacher performance, professional learning and retention rates? In: Research Evidence in Education Library. London: EPPI-Centre, Social Science Research Unit, Institute of Education.

  
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